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Patentes

  1. Pesquisa Avançada de Patentes
Número de publicaçãoUS20080236605 A1
Tipo de publicaçãoCandidatura
Número de candidaturaUS 11/776,352
Data de publicação2 Out 2008
Data de apresentação11 Jul 2007
Data de prioridade30 Mar 2007
Número de publicação11776352, 776352, US 2008/0236605 A1, US 2008/236605 A1, US 20080236605 A1, US 20080236605A1, US 2008236605 A1, US 2008236605A1, US-A1-20080236605, US-A1-2008236605, US2008/0236605A1, US2008/236605A1, US20080236605 A1, US20080236605A1, US2008236605 A1, US2008236605A1
InventoresSarina Russo
Beneficiário OriginalSarina Russo
Exportar citaçãoBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
Links Externos: USPTO, Atribuição na USPTO, Espacenet
Hair extension methods and apparatus
US 20080236605 A1
Resumo
Methods of attaching a weft hair extension apparatus to the scalp hair of a person are disclosed. An illustrated method comprises: passing strands of scalp hair through at least one of a plurality of beads that are affixed to or integral with a seam of the weft hair extension apparatus; passing strands of scalp hair and stands of extension hair through at least one of a plurality of deformable locking beads; and, deforming the at least one of the plurality of deformable locking beads such that the strands of scalp hair and the strands of extension hair passed therethrough are then held captive therein. Weft hair extension apparatus are also disclosed.
Imagens(4)
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Reivindicações(12)
1. A method of attaching a weft hair extension apparatus to the scalp hair of a person, the method comprising:
passing strands of scalp hair through at least one of a plurality of beads that are attached to a seam of the weft hair extension apparatus;
passing strands of scalp hair and stands of extension hair through at least one of a plurality of deformable locking beads; and,
deforming the at least one of the plurality of deformable locking beads such that the strands of scalp hair and the strands of extension hair passed therethrough are held captive therein.
2. The method according to claim 1, wherein passing strands of scalp hair through the at least one of the plurality of beads is performed with an application tool having a flexible elongated loop section.
3. The method according to claim 2, further including:
passing the flexible elongated loop section of the application tool through the at least one of the plurality of beads from an underside thereof in order to expose an open loop section thereabove;
passing the strands of scalp hair through the open loop section of the application tool exposed above the at least one of the plurality of beads; and,
drawing the open loop section of the application tool back through the plurality of beads in order to pass the stands of scalp hair through the plurality of beads.
4. The method according to claim 2, wherein passing the strands of scalp hair and the strands of extension hair through the at least one of the plurality of deformable beads is performed with the application tool.
5. The method according to claim 4, further including:
passing the flexible elongated loop section of the application tool through the at least one of the plurality of deformable beads from an underside thereof in order to expose an open loop section thereabove;
passing the strands of scalp hair and the strands of extension hair through the open loop section of the application tool exposed above the at least one of the plurality of deformable beads; and,
drawing the open loop section of the application tool back through the plurality of deformable beads in order to pass the stands of scalp hair and the strands of extension hair through the plurality of deformable beads.
6. The method according to claim 1, wherein deforming the at least one of the plurality of deformable locking beads is performed with a clamping tool.
7. The method according to claim 6, wherein the clamping tool is a pair of pliers.
8. The method according to claim 1, further including:
deforming the at least one of the plurality of beads attached to the seam of the weft hair extension apparatus such that the strands of scalp hair passed therethrough are held captive therein.
9. The method according to claim 1, further including f:
applying a suitable resin or adhesive to at least one of the strands of scalp hair and the strands of extension hair relative to at least one of the at least one of the plurality of beads and/or the at least one of the plurality of deformable beads.
10. The method according to claim 9, wherein the adhesive is spirit gum.
11. A weft hair extension apparatus including: an elongated seam which defines an upper edge of the apparatus, the seam having a plurality of extension hair strands extending therefrom; and, a plurality of cylindrical beads affixed to or integral with the seam, the plurality of cylindrical beads being larger in length than in diameter and each including an upper flared rim to assist with the passing of scalp hair during application to a person's scalp.
12. A method of using the weft hair apparatus according to claim 11 comprising:
passing strands of scalp hair through the at least one of the plurality of beads that are attached to the seam of the weft hair extension apparatus;
passing strands of scalp hair and stands of extension hair through at least one of a plurality of deformable locking beads; and,
deforming the at least one of the plurality of deformable locking beads such that the strands of scalp hair and the strands of extension hair passed therethrough are held captive therein. _
Descrição
    FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE
  • [0001]
    The present disclosure relates, generally, to methods of attaching hair extensions to the scalp hair of a wearer, and their associated apparatus, and relates particularly, though not exclusively, to methods of attaching weft hair extensions to the scalp hair of a wearer, and weft hair extension apparatus suitable for use with such methods.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0002]
    Any discussion of documents, devices, acts or knowledge in this specification is included to explain the context of the disclosure. It should not be taken as an admission that any of the material forms a part of the prior art base or the common general knowledge in the relevant art in Australia or elsewhere on or before the priority date of the disclosure and claims herein.
  • [0003]
    The addition of natural or artificial hair to the scalp of a person is a technique that has been known and practiced for many years. Wigs, toupees, and/or other hair pieces have been widely accepted accessories for well over a century. Unfortunately, depending largely on the quality and/or the construction of these types of hair pieces, the addition of such to a wearer has more often than not resulted in an artificial or unsatisfactory appearance.
  • [0004]
    In recent years, the application of strands of hair, or hair extensions, to the scalp hair of a wearer has become a much more widely accepted means of altering the appearance of ones hair. When correctly fitted, hair extensions generally look far more natural than traditional hair pieces, and can also be more permanently attached to the scalp of a wearer, meaning they are less likely to become dislodged at an undesirable time.
  • [0005]
    Many hair extension apparatus and methods of attaching same to the scalp hair of a wearer have been developed over the years. At least two main categories of hair extension apparatus exist, namely, individual or loose hair strand extensions, and weft hair extensions. As the name suggests, loose strand extensions require individual attachment to the scalp hair of a wearer. On the other hand, weft hair extensions, which include a plurality of strands of hair bound together along a common seam or edge, enable many hair extension strands to be attached to the scalp of a wearer by way of a single application technique. For this reason, the popularity of weft hair extensions has grown enormously over the past few years.
  • [0006]
    For every different form of weft hair extension apparatus that has been developed over the years, a plethora of methods of attachment of such apparatus has also been provided. Some methods of attachment involve the use of adhesives, which depending on the properties of the adhesive used, may require heat setting during the application process to ensure that the weft is securely fastened in place. Other methods utilise the art of braiding, sewing, tying, and/or weaving the weft hair extension into place on a wearers scalp. These types of methods can be very tedious and time consuming and as such are not favoured by hair stylists and/or other individuals that are responsible for the application of hair extensions to a person. The most commonly accepted technique of attaching weft hair extensions to the scalp hair of a wearer is by of the use of mechanical items, such as, for example, clips, clamps or beads.
  • [0007]
    Although many weft hair extension apparatus and methods of attachment of same to the scalp hair of a person exist, it is considered that none are very convenient.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0008]
    There shall now be described in detail preferred constructions of hair extension methods performed in accordance with the teachings of the invention and apparatus constructed in accordance with the teachings of the invention. The ensuing description is given by way of non-limitative examples only and is with reference to the accompanying drawings, wherein:
  • [0009]
    FIG. 1 a is a perspective view of a prior art weft hair extension apparatus, shown in an initial stage of application to the scalp hair of a person;
  • [0010]
    FIG. 1 b is a side view of the person shown in FIG. 1 a, illustrating a further stage of application of the prior art weft hair extension apparatus to their scalp hair;
  • [0011]
    FIG. 1 c is a cross-sectional plan view illustrating yet a further stage of application of the prior art weft hair extension apparatus to the person shown in FIGS. 1 a & 1 b;
  • [0012]
    FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional side view of a further prior art weft hair extension apparatus, shown partially applied to the scalp hair of a person;
  • [0013]
    FIG. 3 a is a rear perspective view of a weft hair extension apparatus constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention;
  • [0014]
    FIG. 3 b is an enlarged cross-sectional view of the circled region of FIG. 3 a;
  • [0015]
    FIG. 4 is an enlarged cross-sectional view of the example hair extension apparatus of FIGS. 3 a & 3 b, illustrating an initial stage of application of the apparatus to the scalp hair of a person; and,
  • [0016]
    FIG. 5 is a rear view of the scalp of a person being fitted with the weft hair extension apparatus of FIGS. 3 a & 3 b, illustrating a further stage of application of the apparatus in accordance with a preferred method.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0017]
    In FIGS. 1 a to 1 c, a prior art weft hair extension apparatus 10, and method of attachment of the same to the scalp hair 12 of a person 14, are shown. Prior art weft hair extension apparatus 10 (hereinafter simply referred to as “prior art weft 10”) includes an elongated edge or seam 16 to which are connected the ends of a series of strands of natural or artificial extension hair 18. The precise width of prior art weft 10, and/or the length of extension hair 18, may be fixed or variable depending on the size and/or shape of the scalp 20 to which prior art weft 10 is to be fitted.
  • [0018]
    This known method of application of prior art weft 10 is performed by way of the use of a bead application tool 22, a series of deformable beads 24 for use with application tool 22, and a pair of pliers 26 and/or any other suitable clamping tool (not shown).
  • [0019]
    In FIG. 1 a, the initial stages of the application of prior art weft 10 to scalp hair 12 of person 14 is shown. Before prior art weft 10 can be attached to scalp hair 12, at least one bead 24 must be loaded onto application tool 22. Application tool 22 includes a handle section 22 a, and a looped wire section 22 b. Looped wire section 22 b of application tool 22 performs two main functions, namely, it provides an area for retaining at least one bead 24 that is/are threaded thereon for use during this known application process, and a tool that can draw scalp hair 12 and extension hair 18 through bead(s) 24 which is a necessary part of the prior art method which will now described.
  • [0020]
    After at least one bead 24 is loaded onto application tool 22, a strand of scalp hair 12 is threaded through looped wire section 22 b of application tool 22 in one direction, and a strand of extension hair 18 through same (22 b) in the opposition direction, After both stands of hair 12,18 have been sufficiently threaded into looped wire section 22 b, bead 24 is held firm, whilst application tool 22 is drawn away from the strands of hair 12,18 in the direction of arrow a, by the use of handle section 22 a. This process results in both strands of hair 12, 18 being pulled through, or threaded into bead 24. As a result of the process of drawing application tool 22 away from bead 24 in the direction of arrow a, bead 24 slides off the end of looped wire section 22 b, meaning application tool 22 may be temporarily discarded.
  • [0021]
    In FIG. 1 b, a bead 24 is shown having both stands of hair 12, 18 threaded therethrough. Depending on where bead 24 ended up relative to strands of hair 12, 18 after the application of bead 24, the next phase of this known method of attaching prior art weft 10 to scalp hair 12 may require moving and/or sliding of bead 24 upwards in the direction of arrow b, to ensure that bead 24 is positioned at or near seam 16 of prior art weft 10.
  • [0022]
    The final phase of attaching prior art weft 10 to scalp hair 12 of person 14 involves the use of pliers 26. In FIG. 1 c, it can be seen that in order to maintain the position of bead 24, and hence to securely attach prior art weft 10 to scalp hair 12 of person 14, bead 24 is deformed or clamped using pliers 26.
  • [0023]
    Although not specifically shown, it will be appreciated that in order to securely attach prior art weft 10 to scalp 20 of person 14 utilising this known method, more than one bead 24 (clamped at spaced apart locations) will be required depending on the size and/or weight of prior art weft 10, Similarly, although not shown, it will be appreciated that prior art weft 10 may be removed from scalp 20 by way of utilising pliers 26 to unclamp bead(s) 24 in order to allow the strands of hair 12,18 previously held captive therein to be removed.
  • [0024]
    It is considered that this known method of attaching prior art weft 10 to scalp 20 of a person 14 is not ideal, and does not result in lasting natural looking extensions.
  • [0025]
    In FIG. 2, a further prior art weft hair extension apparatus 100, and method of attachment of same to the scalp hair 112 of a person, are shown. In order to simplify the discussion of this prior art apparatus 100, and the discussion of the preferred examples of methods performed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention that will follow, like reference numerals to those used in FIGS. 1 a to 1 c to define prior weft 10 will be used to define like parts shown in FIGS. 2 to 5.
  • [0026]
    Prior art weft hair extension apparatus 100 (hereinafter simply referred to as “prior art weft 100”) includes an elongated edge or seam 116 to which are connected the ends of a series of strands of natural or artificial extension hair 118. Like in the case of the prior art weft 10 described with reference to FIGS. 1 a to 1 c, the precise width of prior art weft 100, and/or the length of extension hair 118, may be fixed or variable depending on the size and/or shape of the scalp (not shown) to which prior art weft 100 is to be fitted.
  • [0027]
    Unlike prior art weft 10 shown in FIGS. 1 a to 1 c, prior art weft 100 of FIG. 2 includes a series of rings 128 that are affixed at spaced intervals along the length of seam 116 by way of stitching 130, or the like. As prior art weft 100 includes integral rings 128 that are used during the application process (described below) of prior art weft 100 to scalp hair 112 of a person (not shown), no additional beads or rings are required to secure prior art weft 100 to the scalp of a person.
  • [0028]
    In FIG. 2, it is shown that due to the particular configuration of the stitching 130 of rings 128 onto seam 116 of prior art weft 100, rings 128 are movable to a certain degree relative to seam 116. This degree of movement is indicated by arrow d. When fitted to a person, this degree of movement helps to provide comfort to the person, allowing extension hair 118 of prior art weft 100 to move relative to seam 116.
  • [0029]
    The application of this prior art weft 100 to scalp hair 112 of a person (not shown) involves a number of stages. In FIG. 2, prior art weft 100 is shown mid-way through a known application method. Here, prior art weft 100 is shown suitably positioned relative to the scalp of a person (not shown), and a strand of scalp hair has already been pulled through, or threaded into, ring 128. In use, a hook-type tool (not shown) is generally used to pulled scalp hair through ring 128.
  • [0030]
    The final stage of application of prior art weft 100 to scalp hair 112 of a person (not shown) involves the use of a pair of pliers (such as those shown in FIG. 1 c) that are used to crimp, clamp or deform ring 128 of prior art weft 100 in order to secure same in place. Like in the case of the prior art weft 10 shown in FIGS. 1 a to 1 c, although not specifically shown in FIG. 2, it will be appreciated that in order to securely attach prior art weft 100 to the scalp of a person utilising this known method, more than one ring 128 will need to be clamped by a pair of pliers, depending on the size and/or weight of prior art weft 100. Similarly, although not shown, it will be appreciated that prior art weft 100 may be removed from the scalp of a person by way of utilising a pair of pliers to unclamp ring(s) 128 in order to allow the strand(s) of scalp hair 112 previously held captive therein to be removed.
  • [0031]
    Although prior art weft 100 is considered to be a better product than prior art weft 10 of FIGS. 1 a to 1 c, due to its integral rings 128, there are a number of problems associated with the use of prior art weft 100. The most notable of these problems relate to rings 128, and the actual size of same. Referring to FIG. 2, it can be seen that the size of the walls of rings 128 (as indicated by arrows c) is substantially smaller than that of the diameter of rings 128. This small wall size of rings 128 can make it difficult to clamp same during the application process. Aside from the size of rings 128 being a problem, it is also considered that the use of integral rings 128 alone as a means of securing prior art weft 100 to scalp hair 112 of a person (not shown), does not result in a secure connection of prior art weft 100 to a persons scalp. Lastly, given that the integral rings are the only means used to secure prior art weft 100 to scalp hair 112, and that rings 128 are deformed as part of the application process, once integral rings 128 are deformed, prior art weft 100 cannot be reused as further application to a person would be difficult given the deformity and small size of rings 128.
  • [0032]
    In FIGS. 3 a & 3 b, there is shown a preferred example weft hair extension apparatus 200 constructed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention. FIGS. 4 & 5, illustrate various stages of an example application of this weft hair extension apparatus 200 (hereinafter simply referred to as “weft 200”), this preferred example application method being performed in accordance with the teachings of the present invention.
  • [0033]
    Like in the case of prior art wefts 10,100 of FIGS. 1 a to 1 c, and FIG. 2, weft 200 also includes an elongated edge or seam 216 to which are connected the ends of a series of strands of natural or artificial extension hair 218. The precise width of weft 200, and/or the length of extension hair 218, may again be fixed or variable depending on the size and/or shape of the scalp 220 of a person 214 (see FIG. 5) to which weft 200 is to be fitted.
  • [0034]
    Unlike prior art wefts 10, 100, the example weft 200 of FIG. 3 b includes a series of rather large integral beads 232 (which may or may not be deformable) that are affixed at spaced intervals along the length of seam 216 by way of stitching 230, or the likes. These integral beads 232 have flared upper ends 234 which assist with the drawing and/or pulling of scalp hair 212 into or through beads 232. It has been found that without flared ends 234, threading of integral beads 232 can be difficult, and in extreme cases, scalp hair 212 can split, fray or break as it is threaded into integral beads 234. Although shown in the drawings as having integral beads 232 with flared ends 234, it should be appreciated that flared ends 234 are not essential to weft 200, and as such, the present disclosure should not be construed as limited to the specific example provided.
  • [0035]
    Although not specifically illustrated in FIGS. 3 a or 3 b, it should be appreciated that the configuration of stitching 230 of integral beads 232 onto seam 216 of weft 200, results in the integral beads 232 being movable to a certain degree relative to seam 216. As was described earlier in this specification, this degree of movement helps to provide comfort to person 214, allowing extension hair 218 of weft 200 to move relative to seam 216.
  • [0036]
    The application of weft 200 to scalp hair 212 of person 214 will now be described with reference to FIGS. 4 & 5.
  • [0037]
    Before commencing this preferred method of attaching weft 200 to scalp hair 212 of a person 214, scalp hair 212 may need to be parted or manipulated in order to reveal a suitable located for placement of weft 200. Weft 200 may then be pinned or temporarily secured to scalp 220 ready for the commencement of the preferred method.
  • [0038]
    In FIG. 4, the initial stages of the application of weft 200 to scalp hair 212 of person 214 is shown. Like in the case of prior art weft 10 of FIGS. 1 a to 1 c, the application of weft 200 to scalp hair 212 of person 214 also requires the use of an application tool, as for example, an application tool 222 having a looped wire section 222 b, as shown. Although a specific application tool 222 has been described, it should be appreciated that many other forms of tools (not shown) could also be used to perform the example method, and as such, the present invention is not limited to the specific examples provided.
  • [0039]
    To begin the application process, looped wire section 222 b of application tool 222 is threaded up through integral bead 232 so that there is a sufficient open loop section there above. Strands of scalp hair 212 are threaded into this open loop section, then looped wire section 222 b of application tool 222 is drawn back through integral bead 232 in the direction of arrow e. This process results in the strands of scalp hair 212 being drawn through, or threaded into, integral bead 232. As already discussed, flared ends 234 of integral beads 232 assist with this process, and ensure that scalp hair 212 is cleanly threaded through integral beads 232.
  • [0040]
    The final stages of application of weft 200 to scalp hair 212 of person 214 are shown in FIG. 5. In this figure it can be seen that in order to secure weft 200 to scalp hair 212, at least one additional locking bead 224 is used relative to each of integral beads 232. The application of at least one locking bead 224 is performed as follows. After at least one locking bead 224 is loaded onto application tool 222, strands of scalp hair 212 are threaded through looped wire section 222 b of application tool 222, along with strands of extension hair 218. After both stands of hair 212,218 have been sufficiently threaded into looped wire section 222 b, locking bead 224 is held firm, whilst application tool 222 is drawn away from the strands of hair 212, 218 in the direction of arrow f. This process results in both strands of hair 212, 218 being pulled through, or threaded into locking bead 224. As a result of the process of drawing application tool 222 away from integral bead 224 in the direction of arrow f, locking bead 224 slides off the end of looped wire section 222 b, meaning application tool 222 may be temporarily set aside for later re-use. Depending on where locking bead 224 ended up relative to strands of hair 212, 218 after the application of locking bead 224, the next stage of this example method of attaching weft 200 to scalp hair 212 may require moving and/or sliding of locking bead 224 upwards towards seam 216, to ensure that locking bead 224 is positioned at or near seam 216 of weft 200.
  • [0041]
    The final stage of attaching weft 200 to scalp hair 212 of person 214 involves the use of a pair of pliers (not shown), and/or any other suitable deforming tool. In order to maintain the position of locking bead 224, and hence to attach weft 200 to scalp hair 212 of person 214, locking bead 224 is deformed or clamped using pliers (not shown).
  • [0042]
    The above mentioned process is selectively repeated relative to each of integral beads 232 until weft 200 is securely fastened to scalp 220 of person 214. Although not shown, it will be appreciated that the weft 200 of the illustrated example may be removed from scalp 220 by way of utilising a suitable tool (not shown), such as pliers 26 of FIG. 1 c, to unclamp locking bead(s) 224 in order to allow the strands of hair 212, 218 previously held captive therein to be removed. Thereafter scalp hair 212 can be unthreaded from within integral beads 232, which then allows weft 200 to be removed from scalp 220 of person 214.
  • [0043]
    In FIG. 5, weft 200 is shown as having been attached to scalp hair 212 of a person 214 utilising an optional intermediate stage. Referring to this figure it can be seen that integral beads 232 of weft 200 have also been clamped by a suitable tool (not shown), such as a pliers 26 of FIG. 1 c, to provide a more permanent attachment of weft 200 to scalp 220 of person 214. This intermediate step of clamping integral beads 232 may be performed before or after locking beads 224 are affixed to strands of scalp hair 212 and extension hair 218.
  • [0044]
    Finally, although not shown in the drawings, the preferred method of attaching weft 200 to scalp hair 212 of a person 214, may also involve yet a further optional intermediate stage of applying a suitable resin or adhesive, such as, for example, spirit gum, to the strands of scalp hair 212 threaded through integral beads 232, such that the spirit gum can seep or bleed into the scalp hair 212 within integral beads 232. The spirit gum helps to maintain weft 200 securely attached to scalp hair 212.
  • [0045]
    From the foregoing, it can be seen that improved hair extension apparatus and methods of attaching the same to the scalp of a person have been disclosed. By utilizing the preferred method disclosed herein to attach the hair extension apparatus to a person's scalp, a far better and more permanent attachment of the hair extensions is achieved then was possible with prior art methods and apparatus. By the use of the one or more of the preferred optional intermediate attachment stages disclosed above, the secure attachment of the weft hair extension is further improved.
  • [0046]
    Based on the foregoing, it will be appreciated that methods of attaching a weft hair extension apparatus to the scalp hair of a person have been disclosed. An example method includes: passing strands of scalp hair through a plurality of beads that are affixed to or integral with a seam of the weft hair extension apparatus; passing strands of scalp hair and stands of extension hair through a plurality of deformable locking beads; and, deforming the plurality of deformable locking beads such that the strands of scalp hair and the strands of extension hair passed therethrough are then held captive therein.
  • [0047]
    Preferably passing strands of scalp hair through the plurality of beads is performed by the use of an application tool having a flexible elongated loop section. It is also preferred that said method further includes: passing the flexible elongated loop section of the application tool through the plurality of beads from an underside thereof in order to expose an open loop section thereabove; passing the strands of scalp hair through the open loop section of the application tool, exposed above the plurality of beads; and, drawing the open loop section of the application tool back through the plurality of beads in order to pass the stands of scalp hair through the plurality of beads.
  • [0048]
    Preferably passing strands of scalp hair and strands of extension hair through the plurality of deformable beads is performed by the use of the application tool described above. It is also preferred that said method further includes: passing the flexible elongated loop section of the application tool through the plurality of deformable beads from an underside thereof in order to expose an open loop section thereabove; passing the strands of scalp hair and the strands of extension hair through the open loop section of the application tool, exposed above the plurality of deformable beads; and, drawing the open loop section of the application tool back through the plurality of deformable beads in order to pass the stands of scalp hair and the strands of extension hair through the plurality of deformable beads.
  • [0049]
    Preferably deforming the plurality of deformable locking beads is performed by the use of a suitable clamping tool. In a practical preferred example, the clamping tool is a pair of pliers.
  • [0050]
    In also preferred that said method further includes: deforming the plurality of beads affixed to or integral with the seam of the weft hair extension apparatus such that the strands of scalp hair passed therethrough are then held captive therein. In a practical preferred example, said method further includes: applying a suitable resin or adhesive to the strands of scalp hair and/or the strands of extension hair relative to the plurality of beads and/or the plurality of deformable beads. Preferably the resin or adhesive is spirit gum.
  • [0051]
    Furthermore, weft hair extension apparatus have been disclosed which include: an elongated seam which defines an upper edge of the apparatus, the seam having a plurality of extension hair strands extending therefrom; and, a plurality of cylindrical beads affixed to or integral with the seam, the plurality of cylindrical beads being larger in length than in diameter and each including an upper flared rim to assist with the passing of scalp hair through same during application to a persons scalp.
  • [0052]
    This patent claims priority from Australian Patent Application Serial No. 2007201419, filed Mar. 30, 2007, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.
  • [0053]
    While the foregoing has described specific examples, it will be understood that the disclosed examples are capable of further modification(s). The present patent is intended to cover any variations, uses or adaptations of the invention following in general, the principles of this disclosure and including such departures from the present disclosure as may occur to a person or ordinary skill in the art.
  • [0054]
    It should be understood that the above described examples are not to limit the present invention, but rather are merely example implementations within the scope of the teachings of the invention. Thus, the appended claims should be construed broadly. Various modifications and equivalent arrangements are intended to be included within the spirit and scope of the appended claims. Therefore, the specific examples are to be understood to be illustrative, not exclusionary. In the following claims, means-plus-function clauses are intended to cover structures as performing the defined function and not only structural equivalents, but also equivalent structures. For example, although a nail and a screw may not be structural equivalents in that a nail employs a cylindrical surface to secure wooden parts together, whereas a screw employs a helical surface to secure wooden parts together, in the environment of fastening wooden parts, a nail and a screw are equivalent structures
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US916158328 Out 201220 Out 2015Deborah GlassMethods and devices for hair weave and hair piece attachment
US9241524 *3 Mai 201326 Jan 2016Michael BURCHARDHair extension system
US9572656 *30 Nov 201221 Fev 2017Hoyoung JangSkin weft and method for manufacturing the same
US959689818 Fev 201521 Mar 2017Shangrila SeawrightBraidless apparatus and method of combining natural and artificial hair
US20090056731 *4 Set 20075 Mar 2009Ryan TokkoLow Stress Attachment of Hair Extensions
US20100059079 *24 Abr 200911 Mar 2010Ryan TokkoExtension hair piece and hair extension using the device
US20100154815 *30 Mar 200724 Jun 2010In-Young ChangHair Extension Kit and Extension-Hair Fixing Method
US20110197908 *11 Fev 201118 Ago 2011Waters Beverly MayHair extension
US20140034077 *3 Mai 20136 Fev 2014Michael BURCHARDHair extension system
US20140060566 *4 Set 20126 Mar 2014Natalie L. WalkerHair extensions
US20140128908 *30 Out 20138 Mai 2014Lisa DeAngelisAppearance Enhancement System
US20140379084 *30 Nov 201225 Dez 2014Hoyoung JangSkin weft and method for manufacturing the same
WO2014092241A1 *16 Jan 201319 Jun 2014(주)헤어커투어Hairpiece
Classificações
Classificação dos EUA132/201, 132/53
Classificação InternacionalA41G5/00
Classificação CooperativaA41G5/0086, A41G5/0066
Classificação EuropeiaA41G5/00C6, A41G5/00C4C2
Eventos Legais
DataCódigoEventoDescrição
23 Ago 2007ASAssignment
Owner name: IMAGE ADDICT AUSTRALIA PTY LTD., AUSTRALIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNOR:RUSSO, SARINA;REEL/FRAME:019749/0152
Effective date: 20070816